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How to Choose a Secured Credit Card

The best credit cards are for people with the best credit scores. This fact is frustrating for people with bad credit scores. Fortunately, secured credit cards offer a straightforward way to rebuild or repair credit with financial responsibility. But what should you look out for when picking your next card? Here are our top tips on how to choose a secured credit card.

What to Look for When Picking a Secured Card

There are four key features to look for when choosing a secured card:

Affordable Security Deposit

What separates a secured credit card from an unsecured card is the security deposit. This deposit acts as collateral for the credit line, making lenders more willing to offer credit cards to people with bad credit scores.

Many secured credit cards require a deposit of around $200 to $300. Some credit union secured cards require a deposit lower than this. Generally speaking, however, plan for a minimum deposit of around $200. You can always deposit more (sometimes up to $5,000 for a personal card and about $35,000 for a business secured card), but for many, a minimum deposit is all they can afford to spend.

If affordability is an option, consider a card with a low deposit requirement. The Capital One Secured Card, Discover it Secured Card, and BankAmericard Secured credit cards all require just $200, making them accessible for people with bad credit and modest finances. Other popular cards, like Green Dot, First Progress, and OpenSky, also require just a $200 deposit.

Manageable Fees

Most secured cards come with a variety of fees, but make sure you don’t get a card with a ton of hidden fees or high charges for essential services. Many of the charges are avoidable under most circumstances. If you pay your bill on time, for example, you won’t have to worry about late fees, APR, or penalty fees.

One fee you may not be able to avoid is the annual fee. Many secured cards charge an annual fee. Costs vary but expect a yearly charge of between $25 and $99. Any annual fee over $50 is too much, as you probably won’t get what you pay for. Instead, aim for a secured card with an annual fee of $50 or less.

If you are paying a higher annual fee, make sure you get your money’s worth. The Green Dot primor Gold and the First Progress Platinum Prestige Mastercard, for instance, have a $49 annual fee but offer an unbeatable APR under 10%. That impressive APR makes the annual fee worth it – but without an enticing offer like that, you should avoid cards with high fees.

Credit Bureau Reporting

Secured cards are primarily for building credit. As such, all worthwhile secured cards should report to the major credit bureaus. Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion are the three major credit reporting agencies, so make sure your card regularly reports to these bureaus. Making consistent on-time payments, paying statement balances in full, and keeping your credit utilization low are all keys to boosting your credit score.

Related Article: How Bad Is My Credit Score?

Chance to Upgrade

Some secured cards offer automatic upgrades. Discover, for instance, may upgrade the Discover it Secured Card to a Discover it Chrome Card in as little as six months. Not every credit card issuer offers a path to upgrading, though, so make sure to consider your future credit plans before applying.

Just because a bank or issuer doesn’t offer unsecured cards doesn’t mean you should avoid applying, however. Cards like the OpenSky Secured Visa don’t require a credit check and allow deposits of up to $3,000. Using cards like this, or even offers from First Progress or Green Dot Bank, makes sense for those who want a credit score boost.

If you have an average credit score in the 600s, an existing secured card can quickly boost your score by increasing the credit line with a large deposit. Add a few thousand dollars to your deposit, and a 650 credit score can become 675 or even 680 (good credit) in a few months. This boost comes from an increase in overall credit limits and a reduction in credit utilization.

Related Article: How to Bounce Back from a Subprime Credit Score

Things Not to Worry About

There are also things not to worry about when choosing a secured card. The biggest of these factors is rewards. There are secured cards with rewards, such as the Discover it. While the card does offer 2% back on gas and dining purchases, in reality, this won’t add much value. Given that many people will make a minimum deposit, the total amount of rewards available is likely $10 or so per year. Yes, this is still a reward, but is it worth it versus building your credit and getting a lower APR with another card?

Summing It Up

Before choosing a secured card, pay close attention to a few key features:

  • Annual fee
  • Hidden fees
  • Minimum deposit required
  • Ability to build credit quickly

There are many other factors to consider, such as APR (if you plan to carry a balance) and rewards. If you carefully consider the pros and cons and keep an eye on the bigger picture – your credit future – you can rebound from bad credit and move on to balance transfer cards, or even impressive rewards cards, shortly.

Related Article: What Are the Easiest Credit Cards for Bad Credit to Get?

About: Cory
Cory Santos

Cory is BestCards.com's "Jack of all trades" and resident rewards expert, covering all facets of the points game – especially travel, hotels, and airlines. In addition to credit cards, Cory finds that jogging, cats, and memes are essential parts of a balanced day.